Tuesday, February 24, 2015

Interwoven

It's been a little while since I linked up with Kim Klassen for Texture Tuesday.  I love visiting the links of the many talented artists, but my editing style doesn't often call for the addition of a layer of texture.  But now, Kim has adjusted her definition of texture and the rules for playing along.

Texture Tuesday has always been about sharing your artful textured photos…..

Texture can come in many forms…. from the subject, the surface, the backdrop……the processing…..


And so…. moving forward…..
I invite you to share your images layered with my textures, and/or processed with my Lightroom presets….


Keeping the theme …. texture in mind…..


The humble quilt embraces the very essence of texture with its sandwich of layers - pieced top, batting and backing.


 The only tools required – cotton thread, scissors and thimble.


Ripples and ridges of tiny stitches are made by hand with needles, called "betweens." With a gentle rocking motion, the quilter moves the needle in and out of the fabric. This is a most meditative process.


I've been making quilts for almost 30 years now, and I never tire of the process. The play of colors, the texture of the fabric, and the pattern design are my creative endeavor. But ultimately, it's the connection of the quilt to the human experience that draws me back time and time again. The way our constituent parts are interwoven – in much the same way the patches of a quilt are sewn together – strengthens, comforts, and protects us.

I rescued this quilt from a thrift shop and have been carefully mending small holes and tears, restoring the quilt to it's full usefulness and beauty.

A textured life is good life. Like a face wrinkled with age, a frame of rough-hewn wood, a salad with nuts and fruits, or a long walk along a nature trail . . . the best things in life are those with substance and surface.

Linking up with Kim Klassen for Texture Tuesday. Time spent viewing the artful textured photos on her site is time well spent.  Thank you for stopping by to visit!

35 comments:

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    1. Elizabeth, Love that quilt in your photo - recent post on a renewed mind. When facing the struggles of the life, a quilt that protects and warms can make the path just a little easier to follow.

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  2. Oh, Donna, I commend you for the patience of mending and repairing this piece of handwork art! I so adore old vintage quilts. One so special to me, my mom made when she was 20, and unbelievably it is in very good condition, with only a few worn places. Then I have others that are beyond repair, but I hang onto to them for sentimental reasons. Feeling the fabric, old batting, and the stitch texture is beyond real. I love the new updated TT guidelines, and I'm happy you joined in today and shared this quilt, and story.

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    1. Beverly, I popped over to your site and those tulips, drifting into the frame, gracefully decaying, against the textured background gave me a moment's peace. A simple image makes me pause - and breathe. I'd love to see one of your quilts - perhaps in a future still life? Or maybe one of you wrapped up in the quilt? Wish I could be there to take these lovely photos of you - the ones I can see - with warmth and love.

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  3. Hi Donna! It was such a blessing and joy reading your post this morning while drinking my coffee... perfect inspiration for a happy day!
    Your thoughts about what is texture, and your feelings about the creative and human process of making quilts are full of optimism and happiness...
    How I would love to write more fluently in english and be able to comment as I would do it in french and not be so restraint by the lack of vocabulary and idioms...
    Anyway I loved reading your post today Donna, especially as I've been quilting for 25 years now and like you I love the hand quilting part of it and its simple and meditative process... your gorgeous pictures of this old quilt you're recuing illuminate my day, thank you!

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    1. Odile, Not only are you an extraordinary quilter, sewer and maker of things, but now I see that you are a good cook, too! I've been going through your photostream and came across a diptych of an Asian recipe you made - before and after - just love how you bring patchwork into all of your creative works!

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  4. A beautiful interpretation of Kim's "new rules"! I especially like the image with the thimble. and what a treasure you will have with the mended vintage quilt.

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    1. Cathy, Those beautiful tins on your recent post . . . they would be great inspiration for a quilt with their rich colors . . . love the red and teal combinations.

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  5. I love how you define texture and I so agree...I not a 'texture " person either for the most part...but I did love learning about them...I love the new rules so much better...it makes joining in easier in so many ways..
    Your quilt is perfect texture...I love how hard and lovingly you work on them. I'm not much of a sewer so I appreciate others...I do love knitting though so I know the value of hard worked projects...
    Welcome back...maybe I'll go find one of my trees to put up...so much texture there, right? Have a beautiful day.

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    1. Cheryl, Yes, use one of your tree images as an artful textured photograph. I've been working on a series of black and white photos of tree bark - it's more challenging than it would seem to bring out the contrast and textures - but worth the work.

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  6. So great that you found this in a shop that someone else thought was of no use any longer and you took it home giving it a good home. I have the last quilt my mom made and it is really special as she never used a machine to make hers, so much time and talent goes into these beauties. Love the collage.

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    1. Barbara, Thanks for the praise for the collage, but I'd need you to really make a proper collage. You always manage to bring your images together in such beautiful mosaic patterns, telling a story and focusing on both wide and tighter views. I often take my pictures, and after the fact, think, "why didn't I zoom in ? or how come I didn't add this or that?" Oh well, next time!

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  7. How wonderful that you are restoring this quilt! Love all of your images and am glad to see them in TT. (I like the new interpretation of the rules too)

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    1. Roxanne, Hope you are staying warm - or are you outside taking more cardinal pictures! Love your latest image of with the beautiful red of the cardinal against the cold snow.

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  8. Quilting is such an art. An art that has so much more significance than just being beautiful, family heritage and love... nothing like being wrapped up in a quilt made by someone you have loved. Your images are beautiful, I love the little tin of needles.

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    1. Michelle, Thank you for visiting. I've been thinking about that pretty bunting in your image this week - might be a nice palette for a future quilting project. Inspiration everywhere!

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  9. Such a gorgeous quilt and your images are beautiful as always. You captured the texture and colours, and with the addition of the scissors and thread and thimble ... the photos are a work of art on their own. I made one quilt many years ago during an extremely difficult time and I can attest to the fact that it is meditative and healing. I gave the quilt to the person who needed it more than I ...

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    1. Barb, I am sure that the person you have your quilt to was deeply appreciative. I've lost count of how many quilts I've made and given away. At first it was hard, giving away something that took me so much time to make, something I put so much of myself into. . . but then I came to realize that it is the process I truly love. And hoarding the things I make, much like holding back love, won't make them last longer . . . it only hurts me.

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  10. I love the simplicity of these photos. The quilt adds such warmth {d'uh!} and color and texture and the little sewing snippets are just perfect.

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    1. Always a pleasure to visit with you, Dotti. I loved your recent post with your new little studio space. I have the same issues here at my house. One of the things I liked best about taking these pictures - I didn't have to struggle to get the background situated. The quilt was big enough to cover my table for easier photography.

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  11. Wonderful. The texture in the quilting is beautiful. I did quilting for several years. I loved to design my own patterns mostly and the piecing together, on a sewing machine. I also liked to design my own design for the quilting. Fortuately I had someone that would do the actual quilting and putting it all together for me.

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    1. Earl, The fact that you designed your own quilts does not surprise me in the least. Having watched you work your magic on so many photographs, and seen your eye for design and color and texture, it only makes sense that you would make quilts, too!

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  12. I admire anyone who has the patience to quilt. I can't even make doll clothes! But quilts and quilting takes us all, I think, to a place that defines home and warmth and security. My mother made nine-patch quilts, hand-tied. One on my childhood bed had a lot of green in it. I used to lie awake and play "farm" on that quilt. When my sister and I were grown, my mother made us each a quilt with fabric in it from our old children's clothes she'd saved for years. My quilt has a piece of my Donald Duck pajamas. And I treasure the quilt my husband's mother made while she was carrying him--Dresden plate, a popular pattern in the early 30s, with sweet calicoes. See all the memories your post brought back? I could go on and on!

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    1. Candice, You find stories in every thing, and thank goodness you do! Thanks to you, I hold onto more family treasures, I ask more questions, and I take the time to write more - all because you've taught me not to take the blessings in my life for granted.

      I love the image of you playing "farm" on your quilt; my son used to drive his Matchbox cars around the quilt blocks as though the quilt was made up of city streets.

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  13. I love these images and love that they're not "faded out" with added textures! I don't believe I've ever seen a red thimble or a tin needle box before! I've only made a few full size quilts, but I do love to make small wall hangings to decorate my home!

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    1. Cathy, These days I mostly make lap sized quilts. I love this versatile size - big enough to take a nap under but not so big as to require lots of sewing work - something I can actually finish! I usually make 2 or 3 each year. I used to hand quilt exclusively, but as my vision is not as keen as it once was, I often send the new quilters out for machine quilting. I'm sure your wall hangings bring beauty to your home!

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  14. How lovely, and so wise: I couldn't agree more with what you say about the best things in life having both substance and surface. I read a lovely book called the Last Runaway by Tracy Chevalier, which I think you would enjoy. Perhaps you've already read it. It's about two sisters, one of whom is a very talented needlewoman. I loved how this sister identified so much of her personal history with the patchwork of fabrics she used to make her quilts: a favourite dress worn on a special occasion would be immortalised by becoming part of a quilt. All the best, Bonny

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    1. Bonny, I read so much non-fiction (how to take better photographs, how to cook healthy foods, how to make a terrarium) . . . I've been longing for a good round of fiction. And so, I thank you for the book recommendation! I'll see if our library has this one - and get started right away. You are such a wonderful source of encouragement, inspiration, and information! Thank you!

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  15. I had forgotten that you made quilts - - Two of my best friends are quilters. I enjoy working the needle myself, on small canvases, and find it to be very relaxing. As always, I enjoyed your lovely images and thoughts, Donna!

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    1. June, I feel the same way when I visit your site - welcomed with open arms!

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  16. I love collecting fabric does that count. I am hoping someday that Mallory will have time to make a quilt or two with my fabric collection.

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    1. Of course collecting fabric counts! Your talented daughter will make many beautiful things in and of her life - and perhaps a quilt will be one. Quilt or not, you definitely need some form of warmth and protection if you are going to keep wandering to frozen shores on Wednesdays! Can't wait for the spring thaw -and the new photos you will take by the water.

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  17. what patience and steadiness you have in mending an old quilt...resuscitating it from neglect and giving it new life. your photos do it justice...and that metal needle case - to die for!

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  18. I'm sure the old quilt is happy to be taken into a loving, caring home Donna ! It's so pretty !

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  19. Both of my grandmothers made quilts and I'm a lucky girl to have a half a dozen or so of them. Love them...love sleeping under multiple layers...thanks for highlighting wonderful memories! Always beautiful art here!

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